Tag:Culture / Japan Travel Videos

Must-visit destinations, Niigata

Niigata is one of the prefectures on Japan’s main island that are located along the Sea of Japan. Sado Island, off the coast of Niigata City, is known for its music festival and has a Taiko Centre where you can learn all about Japanese drumming. Explore Niigata’s coast or go hiking and skiing in the mountains - the region around Minamiuonuma is one of the world’s heaviest snowfall areas. And try the local cuisine. In Japan, Niigata Prefecture is known for its high-quality rice and sake. You can taste some of the leading local brands at the Ponshukan Sake Museum.

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Journey to Iwate

Iwate is the second-largest prefecture in Japan, located in the Tohoku region in the northeast of the country’s main island. Iwate is known for its stunning landscapes from mountains and valleys to a spectacular coastline. Take a masterclass in Japanese culture and folk tales in Tono Valley, explore the Ryusendo Cave and its underground lakes in Iwaizumi, or visit the seaside. The coast is part of the Sanriku Fukko National Park that stretches out along the Pacific Ocean. In Miyako City, a main fishing port, you can enjoy local seafood and scenic spots like Jodogahama Beach and the Blue Cave.

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Kumamoto, rugby legend's visit

Kumamoto Prefecture is located in southern Japan, in the middle of Kyushu Island. At its center prefecture is Mount Aso, an active volcano. The Aso Unesco Global Geopark has an exceptional landscape with one of the largest calderas in the world. Explore the area cycling or go hiking on the peaks and plains here. Kumamoto also has a beautiful coast and onsen hot springs. Kumamoto City is the seat of the prefectual government. Its symbol is Kumamoto Castle, which sustained significant damage in the 2016 Kumamoto Earthquakes and is being restored. Another historic site in the city is the landscape garden Suizenji Park.

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Saitama, rugby legend's visit

Saitama Prefecture is located just north of Tokyo. Omiya in Saitama City is easily reached from major stations in the capital. Musashi Ichinomiya Hikawa Shrine gives Omiya its name, literally meaning large shrine. The city is also known for bonsai. The Omiya Bonsai Art Museum showcases the Japanese art of cultivating small bonsai trees. Kawagoe is another popular day trip destination in Saitama. It is known as “Little Edo” because of its traditional architecture and old-fashioned streets and shops. Edo is the old name of Tokyo and here you experience a little bit of the Edo Period (1603-1867).

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Fukuoka, rugby legend's visit

If you travel by Shinkansen train from Tokyo to Kyushu Island, you will first come to Fukuoka Prefecture. Its capital Fukuoka City is a former castle town and now the biggest city on Kyushu Island. Ohori Park is located on the old castle grounds. The Kyushu National Museum has an excellent collection showing Japanese art and history. It is located nearby in Dazaifu, the former governmental center of Kyushu. The Dazaifu Tenmangu Shrine is the national headquarter for all Tenmangu shrines. Also in the Fukuoka area is Munakata Taisha, UNESCO World Heritage and one of the oldest shrines in Japan.

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Tokyo sumo experience by rugby legends

Sumo has a long tradition in Japan and is the country’s national sport. There are six professional sumo grand tournaments held each year, three of them in Tokyo (January, May, and September) at the Ryogoku Kokugikan. Some sumo stables allow visitors to watch their morning practice sessions. Usually, only sumo wrestlers are allowed to step into a dohyo (sumo ring). At Raien Sumo Tokyo, you can try sumo yourself and dress and train like a sumo wrestler, a rikishi. A sumo experience lesson with former sumo wrestlers teaches sumo basics, including how to put on a mawashi belt.

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Asakusa, rugby legends' visit

Tokyo’s famous Asakusa district is home to the city’s oldest temple, Senso-ji. Many small shops, restaurants, and bars are located in the area surrounding the temple. Kappabashi Street is lined with shops that sell everything you might need in a kitchen or restaurant, including food sample imitations many stores use to show their menu. You can make some food samples yourself or learn how to cook real Japanese dishes here. For a special experience, go on a dinner cruise on Sumida River, which runs past Asakusa. Cruises include traditional Japanese meals and are a fun way to see Tokyo.

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Tokyo, rugby legends' visit

Tokyo is a huge metropolis where old and new co-exist. It has many different areas. Roppongi Hills for example is the modern Tokyo, which you can see from Tokyo City View observation deck. In contrast, the Yanesen area is an old district with a retro feel that has escaped development. Tokyo has thousands of good places for eating and shopping and also excellent museums. The Samurai Museum is all about history, while a visit to the Mori Building Digital Art Museum: teamLab Borderless is like taking a trip to the future. Explore both sides of this fascinating city

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Central Tokyo, rugby legends' visit

Japan’s capital Tokyo is a city of contrasts where the old and new live side by side. Tokyo Tower has a great view, overlooking temples, old buildings, and modern architecture. Meiji Jingu Shrine for example is one of the quiet spots in Tokyo, but next to it is the kawaii, pop, and futuristic Harajuku district. A visit to Kawaii Monster Cafe Harajuku and Tea Ceremony Room Toko-an are worlds apart, but at both places you can experience Tokyo’s culture. The city is also changing for the Olympic and Paralympic Games Tokyo 2020 and now has the new Japan Olympic Museum.

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Kyoto travel guide

Kyoto, Japan’s imperial capital from the 8th century until 1868, stands for history and culture. It is famous for its architecture, temples, shrines, gardens, geisha district, and fine cuisine. Kyoto’s large collection of World Heritage sites include Kiyomizu-dera Temple and Kinkaku-ji, the Golden Pavilion. Also very famous are the bamboo grove of Arashiyama and the Fushimi Inari Taisha Shrine with its long rows of shrine gates. Throughout the year, various festivalsare held in Kyoto. The traditional that has maintained its place in modern city life here makes Kyoto one of the most popular destinations in Japan.

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Tokyo must see places

Japan’s capital Tokyo is a huge metropolis that is continuously reinventing itself. It is the main hub for Japan travel and offers seemingly endless options for eating out and shopping. Tokyo is also rich in culture, from traditional to kawaii, pop, and futuristic. The city combines new and old. From its iconic landmarks Tokyo Tower and Tokyo Skytree you can see how modern architecture and historic structures sit next to each other in the sprawling cityscape. The forested grounds of Meiji Shrine for example are surrounded with some of the busiest districts.

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